Pole Dance Move Dictionary

Welcome to the PolePedia Pole Dance Move Dictionary!

In this section of the website, you can browse a variety of pole dance moves and tricks based on classification or skill level.

Want to browse all pole dance spins? Select “spin” from the menu below. Want to see all beginner-level pole tricks? Select “beginner” from the menu.

It’s really as easy as that.

You can also search for your favorite moves in the search bar below. We are always improving and adding to our move dictionary, and that includes alternative move names – so if you don’t see something you’re looking for, please let us know!

Much love, and happy poling, from the PolePedia team!

 

Introductory Pole Dance Moves

Introductory pole dance moves include everything you need to know to practice safe pole dancing movements and motions. Building your own mental knowledge base is essential for training safely, whether you are practicing in a studio, club, or at home. In this section, you’ll find various hand grips, safety information, and more tricks to help you build your pole education base.  

Beginner Pole Dance Moves

In the section about beginner pole dance moves, you’ll find moves that you would typically start with in a studio. Here, you’ll find a variety of pole tricks and floorwork moves; spins, slides, legwork, climbs – everything you need for a solid foundation moving into intermediate pole dance moves.

Intermediate Pole Tricks

Now that you’ve mastered the beginner moves and you’ve built up enough strength to start practicing intermediate pole tricks, it’s time that we get a little more complex with our movements. If you’re not certain whether you’re capable of doing a move, don’t worry – each move will have a list of pre-requisite moves, motions, or grips that you need to be comfortable with first.  

Advanced Pole Tricks

Advanced pole tricks are for the pole dancer who has aced the intermediate moves. You feel strong and confident in several keystone intermediate pole tricks, and beginner pole moves are a walk in the park. This is the next level up from intermediate, with fewer points of contact and more audience-wowing feats.

Browse All Pole Dance Moves Below

Intermediate Trick

Anastasia Frog

The Anastasia Frog is a gorgeous and unique shape that is perfect for photoshoots or as an end to a performance. The entrance to this pole shape is relatively easy in terms of many other shapes. This intermediate move is best done on static pole, but it can be performed on spinning pole as an advanced move. 

Introductory Grip

Anchor Grip

The Anchor Grip is a vital hold in pole dancing that is utilized in many different pole dance tricks, climbs, spins, and more. This grip will help anchor your body against the pole so you are not trying to out-muscle any moves. You can think of this grip as the beginning of a fulcrum to help you move up and down the pole. You should be able to completely release your legs from the pole, or bring them up away from the floor in this hold without your body collapsing in.

Advanced Grip

Armpit Hold

The Armpit Hold is not a favorite for many, pinching sensitive areas of the skin, but it can result in some gorgeous shapes such as Teddy which utilizes the front of the armpit, or the Chopstick Split or Hercules which utilizes the back of the armpit.

Overall, once you get comfortable with the armpit hold, it can become one of your best friends in pole dancing, especially as you move into more advanced tricks with fewer points of contact.

Intermediate Spin

Assisted Pencil Spin

The Assisted Pencil Spin is a wonderfully flowy move that is best performed on spin pole. This move can be performed with either baseball grip or anchor grip and requires a lot of core and shoulder engagement to keep your body upright. It is considered an “assisted” spin because your inside foot assists you in providing momentum. A non-assisted version of this spin would require you to deadlift into the motion.

Beginner Spin

Attitude Spin

The Attitude Spin is a gorgeous beginner pole dance spin that will start teaching you dynamic movements required in pole that are outside of the average range of motion. Once you are familiar with hooking your leg into the pole, the next step is to get familiar with the feeling of bringing the back leg behind your body and holding it there, which will start to test your glutes and how flexible your body is.

Intermediate Grip

Back Ankle Grip

The Back Ankle Grip is a useful hold in quite a few inverted moves, particularly when they are extended. Whether you are bendy or bold, chances are, you have used this hold before without ever giving it much thought. It is such a small movement overall, but it can help you push your limits to extend your body away from the pole, giving you beautiful, clean lines.

When doing this hold, if you feel like you are slipping out of it, you have made a case for pointing your toes! Pointing your toes in this hold can push the heel of your foot out into a “hook” and giving your body that extra skin contact it needs to secure everything in place.

Beginner Spin

Back Hook Spin

The Back Hook Spin is the reverse of the Front Hook Spin, however, because of the backwards momentum, it is mechanically different. Both spins are excellent for beginner pole dancers and teach a wide variety of skills on the pole. In this spin, you will need to generate more backwards momentum to bring your body around the pole successfully.

Intermediate Spin

Ballerina Spin

The Ballerina Spin is an elegant spin that truly showcases the beauty of pole dancing. With one leg wrapped around the pole and the other extended, you can begin playing with different shapes on the pole. This can be done as a pose on static pole, but is best performed on spin pole.

Introductory Grip

Baseball Grip

The Baseball Grip the most basic hold you will learn in pole dancing, and it is used in a wide variety of moves from beginner to expert level. Imagine you are holding a baseball bat instead of a pole. Your thumbs are wrapped around the pole, on the opposite side of the rest of your fingers. You’ll use this in any number of moves from a basic body roll, to a cradle spin, to a two-handed Meathook.