Intermediate Level Pole Dance Moves

Anastasia Frog

The Anastasia Frog is a gorgeous and unique shape that is perfect for photoshoots or as an end to a performance. The entrance to this pole shape is relatively easy in terms of many other shapes. This intermediate move is best done on static pole, but it can be performed on spinning pole as an advanced move. 

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Assisted Pencil Spin

The Assisted Pencil Spin is a wonderfully flowy move that is best performed on spin pole. This move can be performed with either baseball grip or anchor grip and requires a lot of core and shoulder engagement to keep your body upright. It is considered an “assisted” spin because your inside foot assists you in providing momentum. A non-assisted version of this spin would require you to deadlift into the motion.

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Back Ankle Grip

The Back Ankle Grip is a useful hold in quite a few inverted moves, particularly when they are extended. Whether you are bendy or bold, chances are, you have used this hold before without ever giving it much thought. It is such a small movement overall, but it can help you push your limits to extend your body away from the pole, giving you beautiful, clean lines.

When doing this hold, if you feel like you are slipping out of it, you have made a case for pointing your toes! Pointing your toes in this hold can push the heel of your foot out into a “hook” and giving your body that extra skin contact it needs to secure everything in place.

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Ballerina Spin

The Ballerina Spin is an elegant spin that truly showcases the beauty of pole dancing. With one leg wrapped around the pole and the other extended, you can begin playing with different shapes on the pole. This can be done as a pose on static pole, but is best performed on spin pole.

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Basic Foot Hold

This Basic Foot Hold is a versatile move where your toes are pointed towards the floor (or ceiling, for inverted moves) and most of your foot is on the pole, providing a strong point of contact.

The key to this hold is to make sure you feel secure, which may mean for some feet, depending on structure or flexibility, that may be easier to maintain with the heel to the side of the pole instead of directly on it. The balls of the feet should always be firmly pressed into the pole. Moving the heel like this will give you another contact point in the arch of your foot.

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